District Students Show Steady Gains Against State Standards

LOS ANGELES (Aug. 31, 2012) - Students in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) improved their performance on a test measuring their ability in several subjects against state standards, capping a decade of higher gains on the exam, according to a report released today by the District.

The Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) scores gauged student performance in math, English, science and history. The latest results showed that students from elementary to high school raised their scores District-wide from a year earlier across every subject in nearly every level.  

“Scores are up in most schools and we are proud of the progress made,” said Board President Mónica García. “Students, teachers and staff are working hard and we will continue this trend until we reach every child.”

Superintendent John Deasy agreed. “The test scores show that we’re making steady progress throughout the District. He credited this year’s results to several factors: dedicated teachers, involved parents and supportive administrators.  

“We expect the upward trend to continue this school year, as we raise the bar even higher, adding more rigor while making our graduates college-prepared and career-ready,” Deasy said.

District-wide, the report showed that skill levels in English language arts rose four percentage points to 48% from 44% a year ago. Every grade level increased by at least three percentage points, with grades four, six, seven and eight jumping by five percentage points from a year earlier.

In addition, math scores grew two percentage points to 45% from 43% over the same period. The greatest growth in percentage points took place among seventh-graders, whose results rose by four percentage points versus a year ago. Those taking Algebra I and Geometry increased by three percentage points from a year ago.
 

 

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Chg. 2011 to 2012

Chg. 2006 to 2012

English Language Arts

30

31

34

38

41

44

48

4

18

  Elementary ELA

34

36

39

44

46

50

54

4

20

  Secondary ELA

26

27

31

34

37

39

44

5

18

Mathematics

31

31

35

37

39

43

45

2

14

  Elementary Math

48

50

54

57

57

63

63

0

15

  Secondary Math

17

17

20

22

25

27

30

3

13




Highlights from the report included:

•    The proficiency rate rose for every subgroup by at least two percentage points in English, but the increase for African American and socio-economically disadvantaged students (those who are on free or reduced lunch or students and whose parents lack a high school diploma) grew by five percentage points.

•    The percentage of students scoring at the lowest-levels dropped by three percentage points in English language arts and by two percentage points in math.

•    In science, elementary and middle schools recorded gains from a year earlier. Fifth-graders raised their scores by three percentage points and eighth-graders by five percentage points compared to a year ago. High school sophomores rose in life science, biology and chemistry over the same period.

Still, the report shows a persistent achievement gap for black and Latino students compared to whites. While raising overall scores in English, African Americans slightly narrowed the difference to 33 percentage points, versus 36 percentage points in 2005-06. In math, the gap increased slightly to 36 percentage points from 35 during the same period.

Latinos reported a similar pattern. With their English scores rising, Latinos made up ground on whites, a difference of 34 percentage points compared to 38 percentage points in 2005-06. But the gap in math between the two groups increased to 30 percentage points from 28 percentage points over the same period.


Contact: Daryl Strickland (213) 237-6766